Chief Mechanic Beverley Shibley Lake

Chief Mechanic Beverley Shibley LakeBeverley Winchester Shibley Lake was a native of Providence, Rhode Island and attended local schools in the Providence area. He was born on 6 August 1894, the only child of Beverley and Nellie Lake. He entered Rhode Island State College with the class of 1918 majoring in Engineering. He participated in the Army ROTC Program while a student at RISC.

In April 1918 when the United States entered World War I, Beverley deployed to France with Alpha Battery, 103rd Field Artillery, 51st Brigade, 26th Infantry Division, American Expeditionary Force as a Chief Mechanic. He was involved in combat operations throughout his assignment and was involved in fighting up until just before the Armistice was signed.  On 1 November 1918, he and 13 other soldiers were sent to Motor School to train his unit to be motorized following the armistice. His unit was gassed and he developed pneumonia. Chief Mechanic Beverley Lake was hospitalized for a short time and died on 12 March 1919.

His Army Chaplin wrote a letter to Beverley’s mother stating:

 “He was buried with full military honors at the Oise-Aisne American Cemetery, Fere-en-Tardenois, France. His body was conveyed from the hospital on a caisson drawn by two horses. On either side were French soldiers and, in the rear two American soldiers, with the pallbearers. The band played appropriate music, and the coffin was covered with the Stars and Stripes. A volley was fired, and Taps were sounded. There was a large assemblage of people.”

From 1921 to 1923, the Providence Mother’s Club provided Brown University with money for the Beverley S. Lake Memorial Scholarship in memory of Beverley who lost his life in World War I. A memorial with Beverley’s name on it stands at the Brown & Sharpe Company in Providence, Rhode Island. Prior to entering the war, Beverley was employed there in the Advertising Department.

Chief Mechanic Beverley S. Lake volunteered to serve his country during World War I and gave his life in service to the State of Rhode Island and our country.  He was a true Rhode Island and American hero.